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The Master's of Education in Catholic School Administration

Perspectives in Educational Philosophy


Class
Fr. Peter Stravinskas
Purchase for $900

Effective problem-solving in guidance, teaching, learning, school and community leadership, competencies crucial to helpful communication, instruction, management, inter-personal relations, self-improvement; practice of education and the helping professions as the implementation of an educational philosophy, as applied to Catholic education.

              Perspectives in Educational Philosophy               

 

Rev. Peter M. J. Stravinskas, Ph.D., S.T.D.

 

 

 

 A. Course Description

 

Effective problem-solving in guidance, teaching, learning, school and community leadership, competencies crucial to helpful communication, instruction, management, inter-personal relations, self-improvement; practice of education and the helping professions as the implementation of an educational philosophy, as applied to Catholic education.

 

 

 B. Course Objectives

 

  1. To offer the student a philosophical context for the study of educational problems and issues.

 

  1. To provide the student with broad exposure to continuing educational concerns:  goals, purposes and values of schooling.

 

  1. To discuss the assumptions which underlie the establishment of educational systems and curriculum.

 

  1. To examine various perspectives on educational issues, including secular and religious approaches.

 

  1. To give the student an historical perspective on contemporary issues in education.

 

  1. To present the student with an understanding of the complex relationships among education, the Church’s vision, secular society's ideals, and the individual.

 

  1. To assist the student to view teaching and education as part of the wider human concerns of the human person, the Church, and society-at-large.

 

  1. To bring the student to an appreciation of philosophical thought in the practice of the teaching profession/vocation.

 

  

 C. Texts (Required Readings)

 

Allan Bloom, The Closing of the American Mind

 

John Dewey, Democracy and Education

 

Ivan Illich, Deschooling Society

 

Jacques Maritain, Education at the Crossroads

 

Students should be prepared for a half-hour test on the above works on the dates indicated in the schedule.

 

In addition, the following text must also be read in its entirety, so as to have an intelligent appreciation of the discussions that conclude the course:

 

Curtis Hancock, Recovering a Catholic Philosophy of Elementary Education.

 

 

 D. Reaction Papers

 

Observing the dates noted in the Lecture Schedule, students are to submit reaction papers based on the reading list given above.  Each paper is to be a clear, succinct, and thoughtful analysis of the particular work under consideration, three (3) to five (5) typed, double-spaced pages in length.  Papers outside the stated parameters are unacceptable, as are late papers.

 

 

E. Grading Criteria

 

Tests                            25%

Papers                          25%

Final Examination       50%

 

 

 

Lecture Schedule

 

Session 1                                 Introduction

 

Session 2                                 Realism

 

Session 3                                 Realism

 

Session 4                                 Idealism (Review I due)

 

Session 5                                 Idealism

 

Session 6                                 Pragmatism

 

Session 7                                 Pragmatism

 

Session 8                                 Existentialism (Review II due)

 

Session 9                                 Secular Humanism

 

Session 10                               Comparison & Contrast of Philosophies

                                                 (Bloom Test)

 

Session 11                               Discussion I on Hancock

                                                            (Dewey Test)

 

Session 12                               Discussion II on Hancock (Review III due)

                                                            (Illich Test)

 

Session 13                               Discussion III on Hancock

                                    (Maritain Test)

 

Session 14                               Final Examination

 

 

Proprietary Interest Policy:

Faculty are permitted to refer to notable past work and achievements (including publications and educational activities not offered by Pontifex University, and even those offered for personal profit) in their published biography on the Pontifex website and course promotions. In the context of educational activities undertaken for Pontifex University, including videos, live or recorded, teachers, can recommend or bring to the attention such work for students (even if for personal profit, for example, books or podcasts) but only with approval by Pontifex University and when it is related to the teaching purpose of the class.  An instructor’s related work will be noted in the syllabus as appropriate.  Instructors may use their own materials as required in their courses and learning events as long as the materials are appropriate for the particular learning event.

 

Failure to comply with this policy will result in a warning or administration modification of course materials. Violations of this policy should be reported to the Provost.

 

 

Here is the class outline:

1. Session 1

Introduction

2. Session 2

Realism

3. Session 3

Realism

4. Session 4

Idealism

5. Session 5

Idealism

6. session 6

Pragmatism

7. Session 7

Pragmatism

8. Session 8

Existentialism

9. Session 9

Secular Humanism

10. Session 10

Comparison & Contrast of Philosophies

11. Session 11

Discussion I on Hancock

12. Session 12

Discussion II on Hancock

13. Session 13

Discussion III on Hancock

14. Session 14

Final Examination

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