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Master's of Sacred Arts, Individual Courses

A Survey of Philosophy of the Good...


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Carrie Gress
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A Survey of Philosophy of the Good, The True, and The Beautiful

Part I - The Ancients 

 

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MORE INFORMATION BELOW

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Presented to those in the creative disciplines with little prior knowledge of philosophy, this course describes how the good, the true, and the beautiful have been perceived in Western thought from ancient Greece to the present day. The course will look carefully at how the ancients, such as Plato and Artistotle, perceived the good, the true, and the beautiful within the context of a unified and ordered cosmos knowable through the senses. The medievals, such as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure, saw this same sort of cosmological order in the created world around them, but within the context of Christian revelation. The good, the true, and the beautiful remained united, but were more deeply understood through Christian love and sacrifice. Finally, the course will move to those later thinkers, starting with Ockham and Descartes up to the modern and post-modern period, who brought dramatic shifts to the older traditions. Overtime the good, the true, and the beautiful were separated into distinct entities as man's senses were rejected with the mind as the arbiter of truth.  Subjective thought -- in the eye of the beholder --became the measure of what is consider good, true, and beautiful.

  

If you are looking to enroll in the Masters degree in Sacred Arts please complete the application and we will contact you shortly.

  

If you are a professor interested in joining our faculty or an institution interested in partnering please email our Provost: dclayton@pontifex.university

  

If you would like to Audit this course, then Contact Us here.

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Pontifex University Course: A Survey of Philosophy of the Good ...-3 Payments of $300/month

Syllabus for A Survey of Philosophy of the Good, The True, and The Beautiful

Part I – The Ancients

Dr. Carrie Gress

Pontifex University

 

If you are interested in auditing this course please email efroula@pontifex.university

 

 

Lecture 1: Overview

General Information about Philosophy, Texts Needed

 

Lecture 2: Greek Understanding of the World

Defining General Terms for Metaphysics

 

Reading for Next Lecture: The Apology

 

Lecture 3: Socrates (Died 399BC)

Life and Influence

The Forms

 

Reading for Next Lecture: The Republic, Book VII

 

Lecture 4: Plato (Died 384BC)

Life and Influence

The Cave

 

Reading for Next Lecture: The Phaedrus

 

Lecture 5: Plato

The Forms and Love

 

Reading for Next Lecture: The Symposium

 

Lecture 6: Plato

The Good, The True, The Beautiful

 

Reading for Next Lecture: Aristotle’s Categories

 

Lecture 7: Aristotle (384-322BC)

Life and Influence

Metaphysics

 

Reading for Next Lecture:  Nicomachean Ethics, especially Books I and II

 

Lecture 8: Aristotle

The Good, Happiness, and the Virtues

 

Reading for Next Lecture: Poetics

 

Lecture 9: Aristotle

The Good, The True, The Beautiful

 

Reading for Next Lecture: Plotinus' Enneads (particularly 1.6) and Porphyry's Sentences (Section II)

 

Lecture 10: Dawn of Christian Era

Christian Changes to Greek World View

 

Read for Next Lecture: St. Augustine, Confessions (Book II) and The City of God (Book X)

 

Lecture 11: Augustine (354-430AD)

Life and Influence

 

Read for Next Lecture: Augustine, The Confessions (Book XI) and The Nature of the Good [link https://www.ewtn.com/library/PATRISTC/PNI4-9.TXT ] (Chapters 1-15)

 

Lecture 12: Augustine

The Good, The True, The Beautiful

 

Read for Next Lecture: Boethius: The Consolation of Philosophy (Book III)

 

Lecture 13: Boethius (480-524AD)

Life and Influence

 

Read for Next Lecture: Pseudo-Dionysius, Divine Names (esp. Chapters IV, V, VII, XI)

 

Lecture 14: Pseudo-Dionysius (?)

Transforming Neoplatonic and Christian Thought

 

Lecture 15: Summary, concluding remarks on the Ancients

 

Sources

Plato               The Apology

                        The Republic

                        The Symposium

                        The Phaedrus

 

Possible to use something like The Collected Dialogues, ed. By Edith Hamilton and Huntington Cairns, Princeton University Press, or find online: https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au

(exact translations not required)

 

Aristotle         The Categories

                        Nicomachean Ethics

                        Poetics

 

Find these in some kind of collection, like The Basic Works or find online https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au

           

Plotinus

                       Enneads

Find online at University of Adelaide site: https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au

 

Porphyry

                        Sentences

Find here www.tertullian.org/fathers/porphyry_sententiae_02_trans.htm

 

Pseudo-Dionysius

                       The Divine Names

www.tertullian.org/fathers/areopagite_03_divine_names.htm

Many hardcopy editions available

 

Augustine

           The Confessions and The City of God

 

Boethius

           The Consolation of Philosophy

Hardcopy for purchase or online at: https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/b/boethius/consolation/

 

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Syllabus for A Survey of Philosophy of the Good, The True, and The Beautiful

Part II – The Medievals

Dr. Carrie Gress

Pontifex University

 

Lecture 16 – Introduction

 

Medieval World View

 

Reading for next lecture: Anselm of Canterbury, On Truth and On Free Will

 

Lecture 17 – St. Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109)

 

Founder of Scholasticism

Reading for next week: Copelston, Vol. 2, Part IV, Chapter XIX, Islamic Philosophy

Chapter XIX, Islamic Philosophy

Chapter XX, Jewish Philosophy

 

Lecture 18 – The Islamic Influence

 

The Scholars Avicenna (980-1037) and Averroes (1126-1198)

 

Reading for next lecture: Scivias II, Vision II (handout)

 

Lecture 19 – Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179)

 

An Intellectual Outside the Scholastic World

 

Reading for next lecture: Copelston, Vol. 2, on Robert Grosseteste, Chapter XXIV, Section a.

Chapter XXIV, Section a, Robert Grosseteste

 

Lecture 20 – St. Bernard of Clairvaux's (1090-1153), Robert Grosseteste (1170-1253)

 

Let there be Light: Intense visionary and Philosopher/Theologian

 

Read for the next lecture: Copelston, Vol. 2,

Chapter XXV, St. Bonaventure, I

Chapter XXVII, St. Bonaventure – III, Relation of Creatures to God.

 

Lecture 21 – St. Bonaventure (1221 – 1274)

 

The Seraphic Father

 

Reading for next lecture: Copelston, Vol. 2,

Chapter XXIX, St. Bonaventure – V: The Human Soul

 

Lecture 22 - St. Bonaventure

 

Goodness and Truth

 

Read for the next lecture: Copelston, Vol. 2,

Chapter XXX, Albert the Great

 

Lecture 23 - St. Albert the Great (c. 1200-1280)

 

The Rise of the University

 

Read for the next lecture: Copelston, Vol. 2,

Chapter XXXI, St. Thomas Aquinas – I,

Chapter XXXII, St. Thomas Aquinas – II: Philosophy and Theology

(some excerpts from the Summa, TBA)

 

Lecture 24 – St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274)

 

Read for the next lecture: Copelston, Vol. 2,

Chapter XXXVII, St. Thomas Aquinas – VII: Psychology

Chapter XXXVIII, St. Thomas Aquinas – VIII: Knowledge

(some excerpts from the Summa, TBA)

http://dhspriory.org/thomas/summa/FS/FS018.html

           

Lecture 25 – St. Thomas Aquinas

 

How do we know?

No reading for the next lecture 

Lecture 26 – St. Thomas Aquinas

 

Beauty as a Transcendental 

Read for the next lecture: 

http://www.iep.utm.edu/scotus/

 

Lecture 27 – Bl. John Duns Scotus (-1308)

 

The Subtle Doctor

 

Reading for next Lecture: 

http://www.iep.utm.edu/ockham/

 

Lecture 28 – William of Ockham (1285-1347)

 Turning Everything Upside down.

Read for the next lecture: Handouts on Dante and Christine de Pizan

 

Lecture 29 – Beyond Scholasticism

 

Dante (1265-1321) and Christine de Pizan (1364-1430)

 

No reading for the next lecture

 

Lecture 30 – Concluding Thoughts

 

No reading for next lecture

 

 

Reading Sources

 

Anselm of Canterbury, The Major Works, (Oxford World Classics)

 

Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae, Available online

http://newadvent.org/summa/

 

Frederick Copelston

A History of Philosophy, Vol 2, Augustine to Scotus

 

Hildegard of Bingen, Scivias, II, Vision II, Handout

Dante, Convivio, Handout

Christine de Pizan, The Book of the City of Ladies, Handout

 

Further Reading: 

 

Gothic Architecture and Scholasticism, by Erwin Panofsky

Art and Beauty in the Middle Ages, by Umberto Eco

The Esthetics of the Middle Ages, by Edgar de Bruyne

Podcast: History of Philosophy whiteout any gaps, Dr. Peter Adamson. Historyofphilosophy.net

 

Lecture 31 – Introduction 

 

From Renaissance to Rubbish to Revival

 

Reading for next lecture: 

On Descartes

Copleston, A History of Philosophy, Volume IV (in Book II), Chapter II.

 

Lecture 32 – Rene Descartes (1596–1650) 

 

Father of Modern Philosophy

 

Reading for next lecture: 

Copleston, A History…, Vol. V (in Book II), Chapter I

 

Lecture 33 – Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679)

 

Rewiring the System

 

Reading for next lecture: 

On Locke

Copleston, A History…, Vol. V, Chapter IV and Chapter VI

On Newton

Copleston, A History…, Vol. V, Chapter VIII

 

Lecture 34 – John Locke and Isaac Newton

 

Early Enlightenment

 

Reading for next lecture: 

On Hume

Copleston, A History…, Vol. V, Chapters XIV and XVI

 

Lecture 35 – Hume (1711–1776) 

 

Deeper into Doubt

 

Reading for next lecture: 

Copleston, A History…, Vol. VI, Chapter III

 

Lecture 36 – Rousseau (1712-1778)

 

State of Nature

 

Reading for next lecture: 

Copleston, A History, Vol. VI, Chapter XV

 

Lecture 37 – Immanuel Kant (1724–1804)

 

The Copernican Turn

 

Reading for next lecture:

Hegel at the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Schopenhauer at the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy 

 

Lecture 38 - Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831) and Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)

 

Spirit and History

 

Reading for the Next Lecture: 

Romanticism 

Yes, this is from Wikipedia, but it was the best description I found online. For further reading, though not required, go to Isaiah Berlin, The Roots of Romanticism, Princeton University Press, 2001.

 

Lecture 39 – Romanticism

 

The Revolt Against the Enlightenment

 

Reading for next lecture: 

Mill at the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Lecture 40 -- John Stuart Mill (1806–1873) and Utilitarianism

 

Art for Art’s Sake

 

Reading for next lecture: 

Marx at the  Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Nietzsche at the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Russell at Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Lecture 41– Marx, Nietzsche, and Russell

Radical Shifts

 

Reading for next lecture: 

Phenomenology at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Handout: Dietrich von Hidlebrand, Aesthetics: Vol. I, Introduction

 

Lecture 42 – Phenomenology

 

Back to things themselves

 

Reading for next lecture: 

Encyclical by Pope Leo XIII, Aeterni Patris 

 

Lecture 43 – Neo-Thomism, Part I

 

Old Wisdom, New Times

 

Reading for next lecture: 

Jacques Maritain at the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Alasdair MacIntyre at the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

 

Lecture 44 – Neo-Thomism Part II

 

Jacques Maritain and Alasdair MacIntyre

 

Reading for next lecture:

Encyclical Letter by Pope Saint John Paul II, Fides et Ratio

 

Lecture 45 – Faith and Reason

 

Quiz

 

 

General Sources:

 

Frederick Copleston, S.J.

- A History of Philosophy, Book II or Volumes IV, V, & VI

 

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

 

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

 

Proprietary Interest Policy:

Faculty are permitted to refer to notable past work and achievements (including publications and educational activities not offered by Pontifex University, and even those offered for personal profit) in their published biography on the Pontifex website and course promotions. In the context of educational activities undertaken for Pontifex University, including videos, live or recorded, teachers, can recommend or bring to the attention such work for students (even if for personal profit, for example, books or podcasts) but only with approval by Pontifex University and when it is related to the teaching purpose of the class.  An instructor’s related work will be noted in the syllabus as appropriate.  Instructors may use their own materials as required in their courses and learning events as long as the materials are appropriate for the particular learning event.

 

Failure to comply with this policy will result in a warning or administration modification of course materials. Violations of this policy should be reported to the Provost.

 

Here is the class outline:

1. General Information about Philosophy

Lesson 1

2. Greek Understanding of the World

Lesson 2

3. Socrates (Died 399BC)

Lesson 3

4. Plato (Died 384BC)

Lesson 4

5. Plato

Lesson 5

6. Plato

Lesson 6

7. Aristotle (384-322BC)

Lesson 7

8. Aristotle

Lesson 8

9. Aristotle

Lecture 9

10. Dawn of Christian Era

Lecture 10

11. Augustine (354-430AD)

Lesson 11

12. Augustine

Lesson 12

13. Boethius (480-524AD)

Lesson 13

14. Pseudo-Dionysius (?)

Lesson 14

15. Summary, concluding remarks on the Ancients

Lesson 15

16. QUIZ PART I - The Ancients

17. Introduction

Lesson 16

18. St. Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109)

Lesson 17

19. The Islamic Influence

Lesson 18

20. Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179)

Lesson 19

21. St. Bernard of Clairvaux's (1090-1153), Robert Grosseteste (1170-1253)

Lesson 20

22. St. Bonaventure (1221 – 1274)

Lesson 21

23. St. Bonaventure

Lesson 22

24. St. Albert the Great (c. 1200-1280)

Lesson 23

25. St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274)

Lesson 24

26. St. Thomas Aquinas

Lesson 25

27. St. Thomas Aquinas

Lesson 26

28. St. Thomas Aquinas

Lesson 27

29. William of Ockham (1285-1347)

Lesson 28

30. Beyond Scholasticism

Lesson 29

31. Concluding Thoughts

Lesson 30

32. Introduction

Lesson 31

33. Rene Descartes (1596-1650)

Lesson 32

34. Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679)

Lesson 33

35. John Locke and Isaac Newton

Lesson 34

36. Hume (1711-1776)

Lesson 35

37. Rousseau (1712-1778)

Lesson 36

38. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804)

Lesson 37

39. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831) & Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1680)

Lesson 38

40. Romanticism

Lesson 39

41. John Stuart Mill (1806--1873) & Utilitarianism

Lesson 40

42. Marx, Nietzsche, and Russell

Lesson 41

43. Phenomenology

Lesson 42

44. Neo-Thomism, Part I

Lesson 43

45. Neo-Thomism Part II

Lecture 44

46. Faith and Reason

Lesson 45

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